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11th December 2014

Comment piece by Aidan Rave, Managing Director of BellPaul Ltd

Aidan Rave, Managing Director of BellPaul Ltd, comments on the UK housing market.
Much of the media comment on the recent report into the state of the...

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Aidan Rave, Managing Director of BellPaul Ltd, comments on the UK housing market.

Much of the media comment on the recent report into the state of the UK housing market by Sir Michael Lyons focused inevitably on the big issue of house building; the mismatch between supply and demand which some predict will create a shortfall of some 2 million homes by the year 2020.

Important though this is, Sir Michael was careful to also focus on the importance of the ‘power for communities to shape the places in which they live and the homes they need’.  Indeed, the clear danger which stems directly from the current undersupply in the market is that there will be a dash for ‘any houses at any cost’ simply to keep up with demand. As the post war years of the 1950’s and 60’s demonstrated, this could prove to be a case of history repeating itself with catastrophic effect.

The notion that people should have some say and stake in the place they live is a simple one. It challenges the institutional paternalism of previous years, where the traditional job of the monolithic council was simply to provide the infrastructure in the form of houses rather than creating homes in the midst of thriving communities. The consequences of the former are stark, leading to social breakdown, isolation and more prosaically the need for ongoing investment to try and rectify the inherent design flaws present. The development of truly sustainable communities requires careful planning from the outset, with the notion of designing people at the heart of the community uppermost in terms of securing long-term success.

Indeed, this notion is no less important in terms of the 25 million or so homes which already exist in the UK. Over twenty five years, Pinnacle PSG has managed to refine a number of governing principles for sustainable communities which are as relevant to managing the present as they are to shaping the future. In particular, there are three central principles which are critical to success.

First, people must be central to managerial design, planning and execution in terms of all aspects of estate management. While this sounds rather obvious, it is too frequently overlooked once the formalities of the tender process are completed. Putting people at the centre of estate management need not be expensive, but it does require a consistent approach to recruitment and managerial development - ensuring that managers ‘get’ the importance of people and that their managerial values, along with their subsequent training and ongoing progression reflects this.

Secondly, despite the old saying; familiarity does not always breed contempt estate management, as we have already established, is a people business. It is also linked closely to the places in which people build their homes and ultimately their communities. Knowledge of this is critical to making a meaningful contribution to sustainable communities and this knowledge stems from employing managers who understand the nuances of the places they work, just as much as the people. This familiarity in turn begins to nurture trust between residents and managers, enabling small problems to be dealt with before they become more serious and over time, providing tangible value to residents in many aspects of community life.   

Finally, there is no substitute for a commitment to delivering excellence in all aspects of services, cutting corners will affect outcomes and will not fail to be noticed!

In many ways, building houses is the easy part; the creation of genuinely sustainable communities on the other hand requires careful alignment of organisational, managerial and most critically service user values. As Pinnacle can proudly attest; the investment is certainly worth it.

9th December 2014

Garden SOS

When you are diagnosed with a serious illness basic things such as mowing the lawn become impossible.
This is the sad situation that two brothers from...

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When you are diagnosed with a serious illness basic things such as mowing the lawn become impossible.

This is the sad situation that two brothers from Kingshurst, Solihull found themselves in. Mark is confined to a wheelchair and his brother, James, used to maintain their garden. After James suddenly underwent serious surgery he was unable to maintain the garden which quickly became overgrown with weeds and bushes.

The problem was initially recognised during a routine estate inspection by Pinnacle PSG’s client, Solihull Community Housing (SCH).  After speaking to the brothers, they realised they desperately needed help however SCH did not have the funds available to undertake the work required. So the team contacted its cleaning contract manager Shaun Wootton at Pinnacle PSG, and the local team were more than happy to help the brothers. Pinnacle PSG’s team has stepped in to help tenants in similar situations in the past.

Pinnacle PSG’s team, visited the brothers’ home and spent a day clearing away the overgrown weeds and bushes and generally tidying up the garden.  However, they would like to take the makeover one step further and plan to transform the garden into a tidy, low maintenance area which the brothers can enjoy all year round.

Mark and James were delighted with the transformation and said: “Thank you so much, what a great team”.

Pinnacle PSG and SCH wish the pair all the very best for the future.

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Latest Media

18th September 2014

NLGN Report - The DIY Ethic: Business Models for Community Integration

This research outlines a clear pathway to an integrated future for public services. A new report from NLGN in association with the CBI and Pinnacle PSG has outlined...

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This research outlines a clear pathway to an integrated future for public services. A new report from NLGN in association with the CBI and Pinnacle PSG has outlined business models that councils can adopt to help them work towards integration.

The DIY Ethic: Business Models for Community Integration written by NLGN’s Head of Policy and Research Laura Wilkes offers practical assistance for all councils who wish to pursue integration of their services but are unsure how to go about it.

Key findings in the report are that councils should rapidly test new business models, start small and develop models at a neighbourhood level that can be built upon. Councils and their partners will also need to develop a joint approach to managing risk.
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11th December 2014

Comment piece by Aidan Rave, Managing Director of BellPaul Ltd

Aidan Rave, Managing Director of BellPaul Ltd, comments on the UK housing market.

Much of the media comment on the recent report into the state of the UK housing market by Sir Michael Lyons focused inevitably on the big issue of house building; the mismatch between supply and demand which some predict will create a shortfall of some 2 million homes by the year 2020.

Important though this is, Sir Michael was careful to also focus on the importance of the ‘power for communities to shape the places in which they live and the homes they need’.  Indeed, the clear danger which stems directly from the current undersupply in the market is that there will be a dash for ‘any houses at any cost’ simply to keep up with demand. As the post war years of the 1950’s and 60’s demonstrated, this could prove to be a case of history repeating itself with catastrophic effect.

The notion that people should have some say and stake in the place they live is a simple one. It challenges the institutional paternalism of previous years, where the traditional job of the monolithic council was simply to provide the infrastructure in the form of houses rather than creating homes in the midst of thriving communities. The consequences of the former are stark, leading to social breakdown, isolation and more prosaically the need for ongoing investment to try and rectify the inherent design flaws present. The development of truly sustainable communities requires careful planning from the outset, with the notion of designing people at the heart of the community uppermost in terms of securing long-term success.

Indeed, this notion is no less important in terms of the 25 million or so homes which already exist in the UK. Over twenty five years, Pinnacle PSG has managed to refine a number of governing principles for sustainable communities which are as relevant to managing the present as they are to shaping the future. In particular, there are three central principles which are critical to success.

First, people must be central to managerial design, planning and execution in terms of all aspects of estate management. While this sounds rather obvious, it is too frequently overlooked once the formalities of the tender process are completed. Putting people at the centre of estate management need not be expensive, but it does require a consistent approach to recruitment and managerial development - ensuring that managers ‘get’ the importance of people and that their managerial values, along with their subsequent training and ongoing progression reflects this.

Secondly, despite the old saying; familiarity does not always breed contempt estate management, as we have already established, is a people business. It is also linked closely to the places in which people build their homes and ultimately their communities. Knowledge of this is critical to making a meaningful contribution to sustainable communities and this knowledge stems from employing managers who understand the nuances of the places they work, just as much as the people. This familiarity in turn begins to nurture trust between residents and managers, enabling small problems to be dealt with before they become more serious and over time, providing tangible value to residents in many aspects of community life.   

Finally, there is no substitute for a commitment to delivering excellence in all aspects of services, cutting corners will affect outcomes and will not fail to be noticed!

In many ways, building houses is the easy part; the creation of genuinely sustainable communities on the other hand requires careful alignment of organisational, managerial and most critically service user values. As Pinnacle can proudly attest; the investment is certainly worth it.

Members of the media can contact Leon Panitzke to access further information and reports on Pinnacle's work, obtain timely comments on the latest sector issues, request interviews and obtain press releases.

Leon can be contacted via phone on 07887 661891 or click here to contact via email.

People Places Potential - Click here to find out more about Pinnacle's vision and mission